Social Annotation


An example of Viddler’s time-line commenting capabilities in Mark Pesce‘s 2008 talk, Hyperpolitics (American Style).

The ability to interact with online resources and collaboratively engage with others around those resources may well have the most profound impact on you and your colleagues as researchers and scholars. But to take advantage of the full potential of the collaborative, sharing aspect of these environments could require a rethinking of how and with whom humanities scholars work.

This week you’ll have the opportunity to evaluate tools that make use of social annotation. How useful could they be for our students? Do you think it’s possible to have our students use these tools to learn and share collaboratively if we don’t use them ourselves to support our own learning and sharing? Do you agree with Richard Miller, who challenges us to “push ideas into our culture”, by placing them out on the web, thereby “showing the world what the university is for and that’s for ideas that belong to no one.”? 

Social Annotation


An example of Viddler’s time-line commenting capabilities in Mark Pesce‘s 2008 talk, Hyperpolitics (American Style). Please watch this 25 minute video.

YouTube has recently made available auto-captioning for your videos you’ve uploaded to YouTube and we’ll see in today’s readings two different perspectives on this latest Google innovation. Educause’s 7 Things You Should About Social Bookmarking offers a basic overview for educators and its article on calibrated peer review might be of particular interest to those of you teaching W courses or working in large lecture courses. I’d like you to read the comments posted by members of last semester’s course. What connections do you make as a result of their comments? What does this progress mean to you in light of our previous readings, discussions and your own evolving pedagogical philosophy and practice?

On Thursday we’ll be meeting in Elluminate, courtesy of LearnCentral, where we will continue our discussion on how to find, filter and evaluate online resources.